Irish Household incomes and pay

The plunge in support for the sitting Government in the local and European elections has been attributed to a number of factors but a general theme is the view that Irish households are not seeing any improvement in their incomes, despite the much talked about economic recovery. Irish GDP has indeed picked up somewhat but the increase has been very modest, at just over 2% from the low in late 2009 , and extremely uneven, with any quarterly gains often followed by contractions, as per the most recent figures for the final quarter of 2013.The labour market has been an unambiguous positive, with surprisingly strong job creation through last year, but the available data from the CSO  shows that household incomes still fell in 2013, for the fifth year in succession, and that trend is clearly dominating  many people’s perception as to the general health of the economy.

Gross household disposable income in Ireland grew very rapidly in the first half of the noughties, sometimes at a double digit annual pace, and peaked in 2008 at just under €102bn. Wage income is the major driver of total household incomes (the product of average pay and the numbers in employment) and during the boom both components were rising at around 5% per annum, with other gains from rents, profits and rising transfers from the State.  The scale of the fall since then has been extraordinary;gross income is now back under €87bn, a level last seen in mid-2006, following a cumulative 15% fall over the past five years. The plunge in employment has been a key factor, but the other components also fell , offsetting higher transfers, and the tax burden has also risen, although it is worth noting that two thirds of the total €30bn fiscal adjustment occurred between 2009 and 2011.The hit to nominal incomes has been cushioned to some degree by low inflation (in fact negative at times) but the CPI is currently around the same level as in 2008 so that 15% decline translates into a similar fall in real incomes.

The pace of income decline is slowing however, with the initial data showing only a 0.5% fall in 2013, and the latest figures on pay point to some potential improvement. Weekly earnings did fall in the first quarter of 2014 but the  annual decline was a very modest 0.4% and included a 0.7% increase in private sector earnings. The quarterly data can be very volatile but the private sector did record marginal pay increases in both 2012 and 2013 , albeit with a very broad distribution, including strong gains in the  professional and scientific area and in information and communication, with more modest rises in retail alongside further falls in  other industries. The pay increases seen in the first quarter were broadly based,  nonetheless, with 7 of the 10 private sector industry groups recording wage gains, including a double digit annual increase in construction, over 4% in industry and over 5% in the hospitality sector. Pay in the public sector is still falling however and so a significant rise in overall earnings is unlikely this year, but the downward trend may at least be coming to an end.

Any rise in average pay will of course boost household incomes, as will a further increase in employment, although  job creation slowed to a halt in the first quarter and the rise in 2014 is now likely to be lower than most forecasts had envisaged.Rents, too, are rising again, offering further support to household incomes, but disposable incomes will be affected by a rise in tax receipts .Overall, then,the big falls in household incomes are hopefully  behind us but it is difficult to see a period of strong increases in incomes in the near term particularly if employment growth slows further.