Irish Mortgage Arrears and Strategic Defaulters

In July, Permanent tsb sold a portfolio of around 10,700 residential mortgages. According to the bank 2,500  of these borowers were not co-operating and a further 3,850 had failed or refused treatment, which raisies the issue of strategic defaulters or debtors who won’t pay as opposed to being unable to pay. How big is this cohort and how significant are they in the context of Irish arrears?

Mortgage arrears in Ireland  are extraordinarily high by international standards but have been falling steadily for some time now. The number of PDH loans in arrears for over 90 days peaked at just shy of 100,000 five years ago, equivalent to 12.9% of outstanding  PDH mortgages, and according to the Central Bank the latest figure, for q2 2018, was  46,000 or 6.3%.

What determines arrears? We have developed a model in which PDH arrears are positively related to unemployment (affecting the borrowers income) and  the mortgage rate (over 80% of Irish mortgages are on a variable rate)  and negatively affected by the trend in house prices, which presumably is picking up an equity affect.

The chart illustrates the model results and the actual level of arrears. Rising unemployment and falling house prices combined to drive arrears higher from 2009 onwards before reversing course as the labour market improved and house prices began to recover. Those factors are still in place and so the model is continuing to predict lower arrears, although it is also clear that over the past few years there is a systematic error , in that arrears are running consistently higher than the above fundamentals imply.

Of course mortgage loans are secured and the level of arrears will be affected by the number of repossessions , which are also extremely low in Ireland relative to the level of non-performing loans. In fact PDH repossessions are falling and those stemming from a court order (as opposed to a voluntray surrender) peaked three years ago, declining to an annual 439 in q2 from well over 700 in 2015.

Our model predicts an arrears  figure of 32,000 for q2 this year, which is 14,000 below the actual outurn. The implication is that arrears should be falling faster given what is an extremely favourable  economic backdrop, implying a more intractable problem and also picking up some degree of strategic defaulters.

Irish Mortgage arrears; pace of decline is slowing

Irish mortgage arrears are still extraordinaily high by international standards , although the past few years have seen a significant decline. The  number of  Principal Dwelling Home (PDH)  loans in arrears over 90 days  , the standard measure, peaked in the autumn of 2013 at just under 99,000 , equivalent to 12.9% of the total  outstanding. and in the final quarter of 2016 had fallen to some 54,000 (7.4%). The trend in the Buy To Let (BTL) sector is broadly similar, although the peak there was later, in the second quarter of 2014, at some 32,000, equivalent to more than 1 in 5 of the outstanding stock. The BTL figure has now declined to 15,500 or 15.7%.

What drives arrears?  Research has generally shown that there are three main factors; unemployment, house prices and interest rates. Indeed, we developed an equation predicting PDH arrears based on these variables which performed very well for a time, capturing the decline. That fall was largely driven by lower unemployment, but the recovery in house prices was also important, with a resultant reduction in the numbers in negative equity. The latter peaked at over 300,000 in 2012, according to the ESRI, and on our estimate fell to around 50,000 at the end of 2016.

Unemployment is still falling, of course, but the number in arrears has been consistently higher than our predicted figure for some time now. In fact it is clear the pace of arrears decline has slowed; the  PDH fall in the second half of 2016 was just 3,300  against over 8,300 in the same period a year earlier. The BTL decline in the latter half of 2016 was less than 1500.

This suggests that the arrears issue is moving into more intractable territory, with the  total numbers (PDH plus BTL) in arrears  for more than 720 days still over 47,000. Moreover, the flow of mortgages into arrears ( i.e. in arrears for less than 90 days ) actually rose for both PDH and BTL in the final quarter of 2016, the first rise in four years.

Reposessions are also rising in Ireland, for a variety of reasons, although about half are voluntary, with the quarterly flow now at around 700, from less than 400 in 2014. This is equivalent to less than 4% of the arrears figure and again unusual relative to elsewhere, this time very low.

The arrears issue is not going away any time soon.

Mortgage arrears model points to further decline this year

Residential mortgage arrears in Ireland are extremely  high, both in absolute terms and relative to comparable housing markets.  At the peak of the cycle , 130k  mortgages were over 90 days in arrears , equivalent to  1 in 7 of outstanding mortgages owed to domestic lenders.  In the UK the figure peaked at a little over 1 in 100 and  in the first quarter of  2015 the total amounted to just 114k, in a market with 11.1 million mortgages. The good news is that the  Irish figure is now falling steadily, and our arrears model points to a further decline this year, in the absence of a significant shock to the economy.

Residential mortgages have been treated differently to other assets by the Irish  banks.  Real estate and commercial property loans were sold to Nama in 2010 for 43 cents in the euro, so crystallising a €42bn loss for the banks and opening up a capital hole subsequently largely filled by the Irish taxpayer.  Residential mortgages were not marked to market, in contrast, and arrears built up rapidly, reflecting , inter alia, societal pressure against large scale repossessions, the absence of foreclosure on any scale in modern Ireland,  some legal issues, political unease and a reluctance by the banks themselves in an environment of falling property prices and capital constraints.

Arrears on Private Dwelling Homes (PDH) are largely driven by three factors. The most important is unemployment, as the loss of a job and subsequent hit to income is one of the main reasons why mortgage payments cannot be met. The numbers unemployed in Ireland soared during the recession, from under 100k to a peak of 325k in late 2012, with the result that arrears  climbed rapidly. Interest rates matter too, although the impact is not as significant, and the decline in  mortgage rates since 2008 has had some offsetting impact on arrears. A third factor is house prices, perhaps surprisingly, but the relationship is clear in the data; the fall in residential values from 2007 to 2013 was a factor in pushing up arrears , with the scale of negative equity appearing to influence the decision on whether to continue to meet the monthly mortgage payment.

All three factors , with varying lags, help determine the level of PDH arrears in our model, which has performed reasonably well in tracking the 2013 peak and subsequent decline; PDH arrears in the first quarter of  2015 had fallen to 74k (9.7% of  the outstanding stock ) from a high of 99k (12.9%). House prices are now rising, so putting downward pressure on arrears , but the main driver of the fall is the improvement in the labour market and accompanying decline in the numbers out of work. As noted, these explanatory variables enter the equation with a lag so we can forecast arrears forward, given the current level of interest rates, unemployment and house prices, and that points to a figure around 50k by year-end, or well under 7% of the PDH mortgage stock. All econometric equations have a margin of error, of course, and debtor behaviour can change, particularly in response to  an economic shock or a perceived change in the attitude of lenders. The last few months has also seen a marked slowdown in the pace at which unemployment is falling, which if sustained will impact arrears into 2016.

There is less data  available on Buy to Let  (BTL) arrears and there seems to be other factors at work, making it difficult to derive a parsimonious model. Arrears in this market are proportionately much higher than private homes, although they  also appear to have peaked,  albeit a year after PDH, and are also now declining ; the q1  figure was  27k ( 19.7% of the total stock) from a  high of 32k (22.1%). The different drivers in BTL are also evident from the decision by lenders to send in rent receivers in order to recover mortgage payments, with the total rising to 6k in the first quarter.

The improvement in the economy and the recovery in the housing market have therefore resulted in a brighter picture on arrears, although these  factors have also prompted a change of tack on repossessions ( the sale of loan books, a return to bank  profitability and  a new  financial regulator in Frankfurt  have no doubt also played a part). The flow  of properties into repossession has certainly increased, rising to 557 in q1 from 354 a year earlier ( half the total is voluntary ) and that figure looks likely to rise, given the reported numbers before the courts.