Update on the Irish housing market

The Irish housing market has been characterised for some time now by excess demand, rising prices and  a record level in rents, although against a backdrop of contracting mortgage debt . Supply is increasing but  at a pace which is lagging the annual growth in demand, so it is difficult to see any change in the existing pattern, at least in the shorter term.

Indeed, house price inflation is now re-accelerating after a slowdown earlier in the year, according to the CSO’s new index. This is now based on all housing transactions, as opposed to those funded by mortgages alone, and showed a marked softening in the market over the winter months including a modest decline in prices in the three months to March. Momentum picked up again over the summer, however, with a 5.2% increase in prices in the three months to end-August, pulling the annual increase up to 7.2%. The earlier slowdown was most pronounced in Dublin and although prices have picked up again in the capital (the annual increase is now 4.5% from 2.6% in June) the re-acceleration has been clearly driven by developments in the rest of the country: prices ex  Dublin rose by 7.1% in the three months to end-August, taking the annual increase to 11.4%. That 3-month change is the strongest recorded on the index ( which goes back to 2005) and is reminiscent of the kind of price changes seen in the late 1990’s.It now seems likely that by December the annual increase in prices nationally  will be around 10%, which is stronger than many expected and compares with 4.6% in 2015.

Demand for housing would appear to be strengthening: net migration turned positive again  in the year to April, employment is rising by around 50,000 a year and wages are increasing again in the private sector, so helping to boost household income. In addition, mortgage rates are falling and our affordability model indicates that the cost of servicing a new mortgage relative to income is at levels last seen in the late 1990’s. New mortgage lending is indeed picking up, after a softer period post the introdution of the Central Bank’s macroprudential controls, but the increase is modest; some 17,300 loans for house purchase were drawn down in the first nine months of 2016, against 16,900 in the same period of 2015. For this year as a whole we expect a total of around 24,500 or 3% above the previous year. In value terms that equates to €4.8bn, and €5.3bn for total mortgage lending ( which includes top-ups and re-mortaging, with the latter rising rapidly in percentage terms, albeit from a very low base).

New lending is still being offset by debt repayment and this deleveraging has been evident now for six and a half years, although the most recent data does indicate that the pace of credit contraction is slowing. Another unusual feature of the market has been the preponderance of non-mortgage buyers , accounting for 50% or more of transactions. The third quarter data  currently  indicates that mortgage loans accounted for over 56% of transactions as recorded in the Property Price Register, perhaps indicating a slight change, although it is too early to say as the numbers on the Register are continually updated.

Residential rents have been growing at a steady 8%-10% annual pace for some three years now and the latest CSO  data, for September, shows little change, with an annual 9.6% increase  despite the Government’s rent controls.

What about supply, which is universally recognised as inadequate. Completions in the first eight months of the year amounted to just over 9,100, with the full-year figure likely to be around 14,500 or less than 2,000 above the previous year. Forward looking indicators do not signal any dramatic change, with  planning permissions for 6,200 units granted in the first 6 months of 2016.

Housing supply may well respond to higher prices in time but there is no quick fix to the current position of excess demand. In that context the announcement of a Help to Buy scheme in the recent Budget is hard to fathom, as it offers First Time Buyers a tax rebate towards their deposit. so presumably boosting demand further.The Finance Minister suggested that this would help to stimulate new builds  but it’s hard to argue that demand is the issue, rather than supply.