Press Conferences, the ECB and the Fed

The ECB and the Fed differ at many levels, including their respective mandates (the latter is charged with  maintaining full employment as well as price stability ) and the frequency of policy-setting meetings (one a month for the ECB but only eight a year for its US counterpart). The Fed’s Open Market Committee, which sets monetary policy, has twelve voting members and releases minutes of its deliberations, including the voting pattern, whereas the ECB Governing Council’s  membership is double that, with no published minutes, at least to date. They do have one thing in common though- press conferences hosted by the Head of the institution- although the Fed has only recently adopted that practice and limits it to one a quarter, as against the ECB’s regular slot on the first Thursday of the month.

The press conferences also differ markedly however. Ben Bernanke has held court at all of the Fed’s to date, and things may change when Janet Yellen takes over, but  there is a much more open  atmosphere than in Frankfurt and it probably reflects more than the personalities involved. This may in part be due to the nature of the audience, which is smaller in number than for the ECB and made up largely of ‘Fed-watchers’, who like the Kremlinologists of old are attentive to the slightest hint of any change in policy. Few, if any, foreign journalists appear to be present and the questions are usually to the point and illicit equally straightforward responses from the Chairman. One senses that there is an implicit belief that the population have a right to know what the Fed is thinking and the questioners seek to tease out any areas where there is a lack of clarity, although of course central bankers are not omniscient and any statement of intent is always contingent on events.

The ECB conference is more formulaic ( the President opens by reading a much longer statement than that issued by the Fed ) and the atmosphere feels very different, at last as viewed on television,  with the ECB President often striking a defensive and sometimes peevish tone, with attempts to justify past policy decisions (‘ the events of the past month have vindicated our  stance’). One is always left with the impression of an audience seeking to illicit answers from a Bank reluctant to elaborate,  which leaves an unsatisfied taste. A good case in point is OMT, which is regularly raised and is met with the response that all has been explained at some earlier meeting  although if that were the case the question would not arise. The sheer numbers involved in setting ECB rates inevitably makes for differing views in the Council and that may explain the President’s  caution in response to some questions but at times the dichotomy between the Bank’s  current stance  and its stated policy aims is glaring; the ECB is  forecasting inflation in 2015 at 1.3%, for example, which does not appear consistent with its definition of price stability (‘below but close to 2%’) and implies monetary policy is too tight, even after the recent rate reduction.

Monetary policy in the euro area is  certainly more pragmatic under Draghi and the ECB has moved a long way from its Bundesbank-centred roots. The  press conference has  also ditched some of  the rituals common in President Trichet’s time, when everyone listened for some key words, like ‘strongly vigilant’, as a signaling mechanism- what’s wrong with saying  that ‘ we are likely to raise rates at the next meeting in the absence of unforeseen events’ rather than use some code?. The questions  also vary in quality and relevance it also has to be said, with some journalists seeking comments on specific country issues which are beyond the remit of the ECB (‘Draghi praises Ireland’s/ Portugal’s/ Italy’s/  stoic adherence to fiscal rectitude’). One final point. President Draghi’s pledge ‘to do whatever it takes to preserve the euro’ was queried by a (German) journalist at one press conference, with the latter pointing out that Governments and ultimately electorates would decide the single currency’s fate. An unusual intervention , highlighting that the ECB is ultimately accountable to the citizens of the  euro area, and that it is their Central Bank.

 

Published by

Dan McLaughlin

Economics Lecturer and Commentator