New Mortgage lending stabilising after Central Bank controls

Mortgage lending is generally driven on the demand side by demographics, household income, mortgage rates and expectations about house prices, which implies that demand in Ireland should be growing strongly given that all these factors are supportive.  On the supply side, the number of institutions able and willing to supply  housing loans  in Ireland has fallen, but the remaining players are in much better shape than they were , and keen to offset debt repayment, which is putting ongoing downward pressure on their assets. So we have a ‘mortgage war’ of sorts, with strong competition among a  limited number of players.

The number of new loans for house purchase did rise strongly in 2014, albeit from very low levels, increasing by 50%, to just over 20,000. The BPFI has revised the 2015 data down but the year still saw another strong rise, to 23,664 , although there was a significant slowdown in the second half, culminating in a year over year fall in the final quarter. That change in trend presumably reflected the Central bank’s new controls on Loan to Value and Loan to Income, introduced in late January of that year, and the first quarter of 2016 saw a much sharper annual decline, of 9.4%. The approvals data then pointed to some recovery in the second quarter and the number of drawdowns for house purchase did indeed pick up on an annual basis, by 6%  to 5767, albeit flattered by the downward revision to 2015. However, the total for the first half of 2016, at 10,401,is still slightly down on the same period of 2015 (10,550) although indicating some stabilization. The lending data is seasonal so comparisons with the previous quarter are not that meaningful; indeed, on our seasonally adjusted model lending in q2 was actually weaker than in the first quarter.

One unusual feature of  mortgage lending in recent years is that it appears to account for only around 50% of housing transactions, and the available data shows that still to be the case in 2016. According to the Property Price Register there were  over 20,800 residential transactions to end-June, which given the mortgage figure of 10,401 still implies  only a 50% share for transactions funded by domestic mortgage providers.

The value of new lending  for house purchase showed much stronger growth in q2 ( 14%) and at €2.bn  for the half-year is actually slightly ahead of the same period in 2015. Even at a constant Loan to Value the average loan will rise in an environment of rising house prices and the second quarter saw the average new mortgage for house purchase rise by 7.7% to just under €198,000 , the highest figure in five years. Other forms of mortgage lending (top-ups and re-mortgaging) are growing again, with the result that the value of total mortgage lending rose by 18% in q2, and amounted to €2.3bn for the first half of the year. For 2016 as a whole we expect the latter to emerge at €5.2bn or some €400mn ahead of 2015, and the figure for house purchase at €4.7bn, with broadly flat numbers for house purchase offset by a rise in the average mortgage.

Published by

Dan McLaughlin

Economics Lecturer and Commentator