Irish Mortgage Lending crimped by supply and competition from non-debt buyers.

The latest data from the BPFI on  Irish new mortgage lending shows that 6,781 loans  for house purchase were drawn down in the second quarter, with the annual increase at 17.6%, providing further evidence that the year as a whole is likely to see a substantial increase on the 2016 total of some 25,000. Yet the annual pace is slowing, following a 26% increase in q1, and on our seasonally adjusted model  lending actually fell on the quarter. What is more striking though is the unusually large divergence between mortgage approvals and actual drawdowns ; approvals for house purchase in the second quarter amounted to 10,250. Looking at the picture over the first six months, approvals stood at 18,576 against a drawdown total of 12,634 , which is a wide gap even allowing for the usual lags between approval and purchase.

Buyers with approval may delay purchase if they are nervous about the market but survey’s suggest that price expectations have risen of late so that would normally bring forward the timing of transactions. The alternative explanation is that buyers with approval are being squeezed by the limited supply of property for sale and the prevalence of would-be purchasers not reliant on debt finance. The ECB’s QE is compressing yields on financial assets, making residential property a more attractive alternative. Judging by the CSO figures on transactions (executions) in the first quarter, mortgage loans are still  only accounting for around 50% of the total ( the q2  transaction data have  yet to be published).

The BPFI data also reveals that the average mortgage for house purchase is now just under €214,000. 8.1% above the previous year and at levels last seen in early 2010. In cash terms mortgage lending for house purchase  in the quarter amounted to €1.45bn and overall lending rose to €1.65bn when top-ups and re-mortgaging is included, bringing the total for the half-year to some €3bn. Our forecast for the full year is currently €7.2bn but we are likely to revise that down, given the  slowing momentum in the numbers drawdown.

Nonetheless, new mortgage lending is growing and it now appears is finally close to offsetting repayments, with the latest Central Bank data on net lending showing  that the  monthly decline in that series is now extremely small. Irish household deleveraging started  in mid-2008 and one doubts if few or any thought it would last this long.

Published by

Dan McLaughlin

Economics Lecturer and Commentator