Irish Housing Supply points to further pressure on Rents and Prices

The supply of new housing responds to changes in price with a time lag, which can lead to periods of excess building and , as in Ireland of late, a chronic  excess demand for residential property, particularly in areas where people want to live. Housing completions  did rise significantly in percentage terms last year, by 33%, but such was the collapse in house building in the period 2007-13 that the recovery  in 2014 left  actual completions at  11k.This added just  0.5% to the existing housing stock (around 2 million) and  as such is  below the depreciation rate. Moreover, it compares with a figure of   25k that has become the consensus view on the  annual supply required over the next 5-10 years.

House prices rose by 22% in Dublin last year and by over 10% elsewhere in Ireland which  indicates  a clear price signal. Completions in the first quarter of 2015 amounted to 2.6k , representing a 26% annual rise, but the pace of growth slowed sharply in q2, to 9%, with  a supply figure of 3k. So completions over the first half of the year came to  just 5.6k and our model now indicates an annual figure of less that 13k. The official completions data is based on connections to the electricity grid so  the total can also include properties previously partially or largely completed as well as new builds, which adds a further uncertainty to any annual forecast.

Housing demand projections tend to put the figure for Dublin (city and county) at  around 30% of the national total, implying an annual supply requirement of 7k-8k. That ratio was met last year although the actual supply in Dublin was only 3.3k, no doubt also augmented by previously unfinished developments.  Still some way to go then to match forecast demand, particularly as  the Dublin figure in the first half of this year was only 1.4k , less than a quarter of the national total, with apartments accounting for 0.5k of completions in the capital.

In our previous Blog ( ‘Irish Mortgage Regulations impacting the housing market’) we concluded that the new LTV limits were affecting mortgage lending and housing transactions but were not having a dramatic impact on prices. There is also evidence that the pace of rental growth is accelerating and the implication is that only a sustained  and substantial increase in supply will bring the housing market into broad balance. The latest completions data suggests that will take some time.

Irish Mortgage Regulations impacting housing market

In late January the Irish Central Bank announced a set of macro-prudential controls on mortgage lending, Similar regulations have been introduced elsewhere, in line with the new orthodoxy in central banking, which  seeks measures to influence credit growth outside the traditional interest rate channel, particularly as rates are currently at historically low levels. The Irish version imposed a loan to value limit of 3.5 on Personal Dwelling Home (PDH) mortgages, but in the current Irish context the  second limit, on Loan to Value (LTV) was seen as a more binding constraint. A  maximum LTV of 80% is now in operation on PDH  mortgage loans, with first time buyers allowed 90% on properties up to €220k. Banks are allowed some discretion , but it is limited in that only 15% of loans can exceed these LTV ceilings.

Contrary to some commentary (and expectation), the controls were not seen as having a material impact on prices, and the Central Bank’s research showed that the  main effects would be on mortgage lending and the supply of new housing. Of course the controls would be pointless absent some effect on credit creation and in the Bank’s base case lending falls by 9% on the introduction of the new regulations and subsequently recovers some ground, although remaining below the benchmark case ( i.e. absent any controls) for over seven years.  In simple terms the new rules will require prospective buyers to save for longer, which also implies greater pressure on the rental market for any given level of housing demand.

Six months in, there is some evidence that the measures are having an impact across the housing market. Mortgage credit standards tightened appreciably in the first quarter and the latest Central Bank data shows that mortgage demand eased considerably in q2, from very buoyant levels over the past year.  That change is also evident in terms of mortgage approvals, with the annual increase slowing sharply in the three months to May, to 17%, from 41% in q1 and 56% in the final quarter of 2014 ( the latter  was probably affected by expectations ). Indeed, the annual rise in approvals in May alone was less than 8% and our own  mortgage models points to drawdowns for house purchase of 5.2k in q2, unchanged from the previous quarter.  New mortgage lending is still growing strongly on an annual basis but at a much slower pace.

Turnover in the housing market , which picked up very sharply in 2014, also appears to be slowing, based on data from the Property Price Register. Transactions amounted to 10.5k in the first quarter of 2015 and  also exceeded  10k in q2, but the annual rate of growth slowed to 13% from over 55%. The June figure was actually 7% down on the previous year and although late additions to the  Register are common the broad picture is unlikely to be seriously altered.

What about prices?  An unusual feature of the current upturn in residential values is the relatively high share of transactions (over 50%) driven by cash and so it would be surprising if the mortgage controls did have a very significant impact in that area. Dublin prices did fall in the first three months of the year, by 1.6%, but rose by 2% in q2, with a similar pattern evident in the rest of the country (a 2% rise following a 0.3% fall). The market has certainly cooled relative to the first half of 2014, but smaller price gains rather than outright falls appears to be the order of the day.

What about private sector rents?  Here, data from the CSO does point to an acceleration in what was already a buoyant market; rents rose by 1.7% in the three months to December but then picked up by 3% in the first quarter of 2015, followed by a 2.4% advance in q2. That means rents nationally are only 2% below the all-time highs recorded in 2008 and are therefore likely to surpass that figure by the final quarter of 2015.  As for housing supply it is too early to tell. although with only 2,600 completions in q1 the base figure is already very low by historical standards.

The central bank model predictions are therefore panning out in broad terms; mortgage demand has slowed, approvals have eased and transactions have  been affected , although  the impact on prices has not been dramatic.  In addition, the  upward trend in rents shows no signs of abating and that  perhaps  best illustrates  the real issue in the market- the shortage  of housing supply in the areas people want to live.

Bit early to blame Central Bank for house price fall

The CSO’s  residential property index   for February showed a fall in Dublin prices for the second month in a row, the 0.7% decline bringing the fall over three months to 2.4%. This still left the annual rise at over 21% but the market in the capital has clearly lost some momentum over recent months and some have claimed that the Central Bank’s new macro-prudential controls on mortgage lending are responsible. Prices excluding Dublin were flat in February but also fell on a three month basis, albeit by only 0.3%, so adding to the perception that there is a common factor at work across the country.

The evidence is not persuasive, however, at least not yet. The rules only came into operation in late January , for a start, and there does not appear to have been a significant shift in the recent pattern of mortgage approvals ahead of the decision. Mortgage approvals in the three months to January rose by an annual 55,5%, and as such not materially different from the 56.5% in the three months to December. Housing transactions in January were actually very strong, according to the Property Price Register(PPR), rising by an annual 68% . The available February data does show a marked deceleration in the pace of annual growth in transactions, to 35%, but that figure may be quite different when all the filings are included, which does take time.

The Central Bank’s own research (1) also suggests that the mortgage limits on Loan to Value and Loan to Income will have little impact on prices but a more significant  effect on mortgage lending and on the supply of housing, which they suggest will be some 2-3% lower per annum for a number of years ,resulting in a loss of some  2000  units  after 4 years relative  to an unchanged policy forecast. That  reduction in supply will put upward pressure on prices , so dampening any downward effect from tighter credit standards.

Any such simulation depends on the housing model used of course, and the ESRI (2) has just come out with some findings of its own. These also point to a significant effect from the new mortgage rules on house completions, with a supply fall of some 4%-5%, although they predict a larger effect than the Central Bank on prices, albeit  still a modest 4%-5%.

Another problem inherent in linking recent price trends in residential property to the Central Bank regulations is that not all housing is behaving the same way. Apartment prices nationally rose by 1.9% in February and by 2.5% on a three-month basis. Apartments in the capital also rose strongly on the month, by 2%, and by 1.8% over three months. The price series on apartments is extremely volatile but apartment prices in Dublin have now risen faster than houses over the past year (by 24.5% versus 21.1%).

Perhaps a better explanation for the most recent slowdown in house prices is simply that a market which appears to be primarily  driven by cash buyers is likely to lose momentum. That’s not to suggest that prices are likely to fall sharply but that annual house price growth in excess of 20% is unlikely to be repeated for long in the absence of excessive credit growth. New mortgage lending is picking up , and showing very strong percentage growth given the low base, but it is still accounting for less than 50% of housing transactions. Indeed, the latest PPR figures show transactions of over 15,600 in the final quarter of 2014, with the number of new mortgages drawn down for house purchase amounting to less than 7,000 , or 44% of the total.

(1) ‘Assessing the Impact of macro-prudential measures’ Central Bank of Ireland, Economic Letters , Vol. 2015, No.3

(2) ‘Quarterly Economic Commentary’, Spring 2015, ESRI

Dublin House Prices: Bubble or not?

The CSO recently released the latest Irish house price data, for October, revealing that residential property prices excluding Dublin  are picking up at an accelerating pace; prices rose by 4.8% over the past three months, bringing the annual increase in October to 8.7%, an inflation rate last seen in early 2007. Yet prices are still only 12% up from the lows recorded eighteen months ago and  so few would consider that the market over the bulk of the country is overheating, particularly as national prices still look far from overvalued relative to affordability, incomes or rent.

The price trend in Dublin is very different. Prices there have risen by 46% from the lows recorded in the summer of 2012 and are now 38% below the levels seen in early 2007, a peak now generally considered the height of a Bubble. That term is now reappearing in the context of commentary on the residential property market in the capital and it does arguably satisfy some of the usual criteria employed to categorise a Bubble. One is rapid price appreciation and that is certainly the case ;  the annual increase in October was 24.2%, a pace rarely seen and then only back in 1997 and 1998, in the run-up to euro membership. Moreover, the pace of price inflation has accelerated this year and  the past three months has seen a 9.3% rise, or over 42% at an annualized rate. Expectations of further price gains is also a common feature of asset Bubbles and that also appears to be present; a recent Daft.ie survey showed respondents expect Dublin prices to rise by an average 12% over the next year, up from 6% twelve  months ago, even though  only 15% believe housing in the Capital is still good value (the  value figure for housing ex Dublin is 50%).

Price expectation is an important determinant of  the actual house price trend , notably in terms of the user cost of housing ( the total cost of buying a home with a mortgage, including the mortgage rate, maintenance, depreciation and any tax breaks). That user cost is now negative, particularly so in Dublin, because the expected capital appreciation from buying a home exceeds the other costs, including the mortgage rate.

Bubbles are also often associated with leverage and Dublin fails the Bubble test on that measure as credit is clearly not a driver, or at least credit from the main Irish mortgage lenders. Data from the Banking and Payments Federation Ireland (formally the IBF) showed that the number of new mortgages for house purchase  in Ireland amounted to 5763 in the third quarter, against total property transactions of 11,257 as reported in the Property Price register, so 51% of transactions were funded by Irish mortgages, a proportion that has risen through the year ( from 46% in q1) but is still well below the 80%-85% one associates with more normal market conditions.

A final Bubble test is whether  asset prices make sense relative to fundamentals and here there is often room for debate (witness the range of views on US equity markets and Euro bond yields). In terms of housing one metric is to compare prices with  private rents , as the latter represents the amount consumers are willing to pay for the utility housing provides . Rents nationally, as reported by the CSO, have been rising now for four years, by a cumulative 21%, and have picked up momentum again in recent months after a sluggish period earlier in the year, increasing by 2.5% in the  three months to October. The CSO does not provide a regional breakdown but Daft.ie does , and their figures broadly track the official data. The website shows  strong double digit growth in Dublin rents (around an annual 15% of late, with growth elsewhere at less than half that pace)  and provides detailed rental figures across housing size and type. For example , a 3-bedroom house  in Dublin currently rents at an average €1,518 per month, or €18,216 a year. In theory, the price of any house, discounted at an appropriate rate, should give a present value equal to the rent. If we use the average new mortgage rate as our discount rate ( 3.25%, as quoted by the Central bank) that  Dublin rent implies a house price of €560,000. The Central bank data has been criticized and is going to be revised so an alternative would be to use the standard variable mortgage rate of around 4.25%. On that basis the house price would be  €430,000.

How much is the average price of a house in Dublin? Our own estimates, based on updating the Irish Permanent index (no longer published) with the CSO index gives an actual  figure around €300,000, which is broadly consistent with the average asking price of €325,000 quoted by Daft.ie. The median price of Dublin property transacted  in q3 on the Property Price register was under €280,000 so the implication is that prices in the capital are still not excessive relative to rents, despite the recent pace of price appreciation.The latter reflects ,in part, a recovery from over- sold territory but nonetheless ticks a few Bubble boxes, but not all.

Odd Timing for Proposed Irish Mortage Restrictions

Interest rates are extraordinarily low in many parts of the world; the ECB refinancing rate is 0.05%, in the US the equivalent is less than 0.25% and in the UK the Bank rate is 0.5%.Rates are expected to rise next year in both the UK and the US but the respective central banks have made it clear that any increases are likely to be moderate and that  the cost of borrowing may well settle at levels below previous cyclical highs. In the euro area the economic  outlook is bleaker and most observers expect rates to remain at current levels for a number of years. This low-rate environment carries potential risks for asset bubbles and excessive credit growth so central banks have embraced the idea of macro-prudential tools i.e. measures that can be implemented to protect against systemic financial instability. The housing market is often seen as a specific stability risk and a number of countries have introduced restrictions on mortgage lending, the latest being the UK, where only 15% of new mortgages can be above a Loan to Income (LTI) ratio of 4.5.

The Irish Central bank has now entered  macro-prudential territory with proposals on mortgage lending designed to ‘increase the resilience of the banking and household sectors to financial shocks’ .Like the Bank of England there is a restriction relating to LTI, but in the Irish case the limit is lower , at 3,5, although 20% of lending can be above that limit. In addition, the Bank is also proposing restrictions in terms of loan to value (LTV ) with only 15% of lending allowed above an LTV of 80%. For Buy -to Let loans the LTV limit is 70% with only 10% of lending above that. The LTI restrictions only apply to principal dwelling homes (PDH).

The Bank refers to international evidence supporting the view that LTI restrictions can slow mortgage lending growth and ‘reduce the potential for a housing bubble to emerge‘ although the impact on house prices is less clear, with the Bank of England claiming that there is ‘some evidence of a modest and lagged effect on house price growth’. The latter conclusion is not surprising as credit is only one variable in most house price models, with income, interest rate, the user cost of housing and price expectations also playing important roles. The Central Bank also notes that LTV restrictions are more important after a crash, in limiting losses for the lender.

The proposals have generated debate, of course, with some welcoming the move as important in dampening house price inflation (despite the caveat noted above) while other have argued it will hit  the First Time buyer (FTB) particularly hard and dampen housing supply.Indeed, the LTV limit would appear to be binding now, with 44% of new PDH lending  last year above 80%, while only 7% of lending was above 4.5 LTI, with 77% at 3.5 or below.

Another issue is the timing of the proposals. House prices in Dublin have certainly risen sharply of late and are now over 40% above the cycle low but outside the capital prices have recovered by just 9% and most observers, including the Central Bank and the ESRI, still conclude that prices are not excessive relative to fundamentals such as income or rents. A greater puzzle on timing relates to the credit cycle, given that the restrictions are designed to directly impact lending.The stock of outstanding mortgage debt in Ireland has been falling now for five years and the latest figure, for September, showed a 3.1% annual decline. New mortgage lending for house purchase is picking up but amounted to  just €1.3bn in the first half of 2014 and is still being swamped by redemptions and early repayments. Ireland is therefore hardly swimming in new mortgage lending so restrictions at this time seems premature, particularly as the secondary aim of the moves is to ‘dampen pro-cyclical dynamics between property lending and housing prices’ . That might suggest that restrictions would be better served if actually adjusted for the cycle, with  the LTI limit  reduced if credit growth is deemed too rapid and  the LTV limit reduced if house prices are deemed in excess of fundamentals.

The proposals may indeed dampen  future housing cycles but also have broader societal implications. The Government  was not consulted  and is now reported to be considering some form of mortgage insurance scheme to help FTBs secure a higher LTV.The Governor of the Central Bank in a recent speech also  appeared to be more comfortable  than indicated in the proposal document with the idea of  FTB insurance although with the caveat that who provides the insurance is important. Insurance protects the lender , not the borrower of course, and has to be paid for.A broader conclusion from the Governor’s speech may be that  the proposals will see further modification before implementation, or a longer lead-in time. As it stands the restrictions do have significant implications for  young Irish households, with a longer period of saving in store and therefore a later age for home ownership, at least for some.

Irish House Building appears to have bottomed

The Department of the Environment publishes  official figures on house completions in Ireland, based on connections to the ESB network,  and puts the 2013 total at 8,300 which is modestly below the 2012 figure of 8,488 and as such marks a new low in the house building cycle. Indeed the figure is the lowest since records began in the early 1970s in absolute terms and implies a 0.4% addition to the housing stock (estimated at around 2 million)  which is also less than the obsolescence rate commonly assumed for the Irish housing market. Last year’s outturn also stands in  contrast to the 93,000 completed at the peak of the cycle in 2006 and alongside the plunge in prices and mortgage lending is a stark commentary on the scale of the  housing bust in Ireland.

Evidence that the cycle is turning is apparent from last year’s data on house prices and the recent trend in completions also supports the view that the supply side of the market has bottomed out, despite a  further fall in annual completions last year. That reflected a weak first half of the year, with 3,700 completions, but the second half saw a pick up, with over 4,600 units built. My own model of completions now points to a figure around 9,500 for 2014, although any forecast is subject to event risk.

Some readers may even  view the  completions total as high given the scale of vacant houses revealed in the 2011 census ( 230,000 nationally excluding holiday homes) and one clue as to the reason is revealed by a composition breakdown of the total, as 57% were single houses, presumably built to demand, and this type of completion amounted to only a quarter of the total six years ago. The share taken by apartments has halved, to around 11%, with less than 1,000 completed last year , and housing schemes make up the residual, accounted for 32% of the total from a peak of over 50%. Consequently the amount of what one might term speculative building is still extremely low , albeit having risen slightly as a share of the total last year, and may tick up further this year assuming that prices do not resume their fall.

The trend in completions  is  also not uniform across the country, with half of the 34 counties and city councils recording some gains. These increases were generally very small in absolute terms, nonetheless,  with the largest being in Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown, where 260 units were completed, a rise of 85 from 2012. That figure was around 2,500 a year at the peak of the boom with building in South Dublin even higher at over 3,300 , but completions in that area amounted to only 203 last year and that was marginally down on 2012. Completions in the City of Dublin  were broadly unchanged around 500 units but rose marginally in the cities of Waterford, Limerick and Galway, albeit from very low levels.

A number of studies on the Irish housing collapse concluded that prices probably overshot on the downside  and although it is less obvious that the same can be said for house building there is a big difference between where people want to live and where there is an excess supply of housing, and so 2013 may  also  mark a turning point in terms of house completions.

 

Dublin House price inflation likely to slow this year

Irish residential property prices fell by 4.5% in 2012 according to the CSO index  and by 2.5% in Dublin, and although most commentators expected the market to pick up a little in 2013 few if any envisaged the pace of price appreciation that developed in the capital; Dublin prices rose by 15.7% last year with apartments outstripping houses, appreciating by 20.8% against 15.3% for the latter. Residential prices  in the capital have still fallen by some 49% from the peak but the strength of the recent rally has prompted some to forecast further double digit gains in 2014. That appears unlikely for a number of reasons.

The case for some further price appreciation nationally and in the capital  can certainly be made. A range of studies since 2012, including work from the Irish Central Bank, the IMF and the OECD, have signaled that Irish house prices probably fell too far in relation to housing fundamentals, such as income and rents. The latter has risen strongly now for a few years ( the latest CSO data for November puts the annual increase in national residential rents at 8.5%) and house prices relative to rents are now well below the long term average. That is the equivalent of stating that the average yield on residential property ( i.e the average rent divided by the current price ) is also well above the longer term trend and on my data base is just shy of 6%, the highest in a decade. Affordability is also a plus for the market; a new 25-year mortgage absorbs 24% of income in 2013 which is well below the 29% long term average on my affordability index and back to levels last seen in 1998. Employment is also rising and  price expectations have also probably shifted, with more people expecting prices to rise and hence helping to bring forward purchases. House building is also at record lows ( averaging around 2,000 a quarter in 2013), albeit bottoming out, and the vacancy rate in parts of the capital is low. There would not appear to be a significant supply shortage in apartments, however, yet apartment prices appreciated faster than house prices  last year both nationally and in Dublin, albeit from a lower base, which implies that supply is not the sole explanation for the trend in prices.The vacancy  rate outside the capital is much higher nonetheless, so in theory at least there is  more excess supply to meet the increase in demand, which helps to explain why prices outside Dublin were broadly flat last year, but having fallen by 6.1% in 2012.

Dublin property price inflation may well decelerate this year,  although still rising at a single digit rate. In part this expectation reflects the nature of the market last year, with  cash transactions  probably accounting for slightly over half the total recorded  by the Property Price register ( the IBF data on mortgage drawdowns is not yet available for the full year) although the proportion funded by credit did rise through the year and may have been around 54% in the final quarter. Ultimately housing is largely driven by credit and mortgage lending may well pick up this year but is still likely to be a a level which is not compatible with further price appreciation at the pace seen last year in Dublin. Repossessions are also on the rise which may dampen price pressures somewhat while the trend in the price  index itself  in 2013 is another factor arguing for deceleration; prices rose by 2.4% in the second quarter, by 9.5% in q3 and 3.9% in the final quarter and so  annual property price inflation in Dublin is likely to slow in the second half of 2014 as those base effects kick in.